Career & Technical Education

How New York City’s New Small Schools Are Boosting Student Achievement and Graduation Rates

June, 2010
Howard Bloom, Saskia Levy Thompson, Rebecca Unterman

Taking advantage of lottery-like features in New York City’s high school admissions process, this study provides rigorous evidence that new small public high schools are narrowing the educational attainment gap and markedly improve graduation prospects, particularly for disadvantaged students.

Context, Components, and Initial Impacts on Students’ Performance and Attendance

December, 2004
Corinne Herlihy, James J. Kemple

During the first three years of implementation in six urban schools, The Talent Development Middle School model—an ongoing, whole-school reform initiative—had a positive impact on math achievement for eighth-graders but appeared to produce no systematic improvement in outcomes for seventh-graders.

Context, Components, and Initial Impacts on Ninth-Grade Students’ Engagement and Performance

June, 2004
James J. Kemple, Corinne Herlihy

An examination of the implementation and early impacts of Talent Development, a whole-school reform initiative, found that the model produced substantial gains in ninth-grade students’ course completion and promotion rates.

January, 2012

A rigorous study that takes advantage of lottery-like features in New York City’s high school admissions process demonstrates that new small public high schools that are open to students of all academic backgrounds have substantial impacts on rates of graduation with Regents diplomas for every disadvantaged subgroup of students that was examined.

Career Academies Combine Academic Rigor and Workplace Relevance

August, 2008
Thomas J. Smith

This “snapshot,” published by the National High School Center, takes a close look at implementation of the Career Academy model in one high school in Oakland, California.

High Schools and Their Characteristics, 2002-2008

February, 2010
Janet Quint, Janell K. Smith, Rebecca Unterman, Alma E. Moedano

This report examines the sweeping transformation of New York City’s public high school system — the nation’s largest — during the first decade of the twenty-first century, when nearly 200 new small high schools were created. Two companion reports focus on the role of intermediaries in this reform effort and provide case studies of six schools.

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