Curricular/Instructional Reforms

Six-Year Update

October, 2017

Ten years ago, CUNY ASAP began as a pilot program serving just over a thousand students at six CUNY colleges. Because of its remarkable effects on community college graduation rates, the program has since expanded substantially and has benefited tens of thousands of students. 

August, 2017

Amid keen interest in helping students, young adults, and low-wage workers build the skills necessary to succeed in a technologically advanced economy, MDRC is studying a range of programs that feature employer involvement, such as career pathways from high school into college and the workforce, work-based learning, apprenticeships, and sectoral training.

Introducing ExCEL P-3, a Study from the Expanding Children’s Early Learning Network

July, 2017
Meghan McCormick, JoAnn Hsueh, Christina Weiland, Michael Bangser

The ExCEL Network, a collaboration of researchers, preschool providers, and local officials, is exploring how benefits of early childhood interventions persist. The ExCEL P-3 project examines whether one preschool program, reinforced by a system-wide alignment of instruction into elementary school, has impacts on a range of skills through third grade.

A Report from the Investing in Innovation (i3) Evaluation

June, 2017

PowerTeaching emphasizes cooperative learning to instruct middle school math and has shown strong evidence of effectiveness. In 2011, the U.S. Department of Education funded an effort to scale up the program, and in 2012 MDRC began a multiyear evaluation of it. This report describes the evaluation and presents its findings.

June, 2017

Forty percent of all entering college students and over half of entering community college students must take at least one remedial course. Fewer than half make it through developmental education. This two-page Looking Forward memo provides an overview of research evidence in four areas of developmental education reform.

Early Findings from a Study of the Dana Center Mathematics Pathways

May, 2017

A promising new community college intervention involves a revised developmental math course that emphasizes statistical and quantitative reasoning skills to align with students’ fields of study. In a random assignment evaluation at four schools in Texas, students report a qualitatively different experience with math instruction.

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