Employment Services

Report

Lessons from the Jobs-Plus Demonstration in Public Housing

November, 2003
Linda Yuriko Kato

From the Jobs-Plus initiative, this report describes efforts to build participation among public housing residents in a program that offers services and financial incentives designed to promote work.

Report

An Introduction to the Employment Retention and Advancement Project

February, 2002
Dan Bloom, Jacquelyn Anderson, Melissa Wavelet, Karen Gardiner, Michael Fishman

Welfare reform has resulted in millions of low-income parents replacing the receipt of public cash assistance with income from employment. But what strategies will help the new workforce entrants find more stable jobs, advance in the labor market, and achieve long-term self-sufficiency? The Employment Retention and Advancement (ERA) evaluation is a comprehensive effort to explore this urgent public policy question.

Working Paper
July, 2008
Greg Duncan, Cynthia Miller, Amy Classens, Mimi Engel, Heather Hill, Constance Lindsay

Implemented in 1994, New Hope provided full-time workers with several benefits for three years: an earnings supplement, low-cost health insurance, and subsidized child care. This working paper examines the program’s impacts on employment and earnings, as well as on family income and poverty, up to eight years beyond the point of random assignment.

Working Paper
July, 2008
Aletha Huston, Anjali E. Gupta, Alison C. Bentley, Chantelle Dowsett, Angelica Ware, Sylvia R. Epps

Implemented in 1994, New Hope provided full-time workers with several benefits for three years: an earnings supplement, low-cost health insurance, and subsidized child care. This working paper examines the effects of New Hope on children’s social behavior, parent-child relationships, and participation in out-of-school activities eight years after random assignment.

Report

Effects After Eight Years for Families and Children

July, 2008
Cynthia Miller, Aletha Huston, Greg Duncan, Vonnie McLoyd, Thomas S. Weisner

Implemented in 1994 in Milwaukee, New Hope provided full-time, low-wage workers with several benefits for three years: an earnings supplement, low-cost health insurance, and subsidized child care. A random assignment study shows positive effects for both adults and children, some of which persisted five years after the program ended.

Report

Five-Year Results of a Program to Reduce Poverty and Reform Welfare

June, 2003
Aletha Huston, Cynthia Miller, Lashawn Richburg-Hayes, Greg Duncan, Carolyn Eldred, Thomas S. Weisner, Edward D. Lowe, Vonnie McLoyd, Danielle Crosby, Marika N. Ripke, Cindy Redcross

This rigorous long-term evaluation reveals that building a safety net of financial supports for low-income parents who work improved the well-being of their children.

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