Transitional Jobs/Subsidized Employment

Report

Testing Transitional Jobs and Pre-Employment Services in Philadelphia

October, 2009
Dan Bloom, Sarah Rich, Cindy Redcross, Erin Jacobs Valentine, Jennifer Yahner, Nancy Pindus

Interim results from an evaluation of two different welfare-to-work strategies for long-term welfare recipients show that transitional jobs increase employment and earnings but that it is difficult to successfully engage participants in extensive pre-employment services.

Report

Final Results from a Test of Transitional Jobs and Preemployment Services in Philadelphia

December, 2011

An evaluation of two different welfare-to-work strategies for long-term welfare recipients finds that: (1) transitional jobs substantially increased employment in the short term, but these effects faded after one year, and (2) it is difficult to engage welfare recipients in extensive preemployment services long enough to improve their employability.

Over the past 80 years, a variety of subsidized employment strategies have been used for two main purposes: (1) to provide work-based income support for people who are not able to find regular, unsubsidized jobs; and (2) to improve the employability of disadvantaged groups.

The Social Innovation Fund (SIF), an initiative enacted under the Edward Kennedy Serve America Act, targets millions of dollars in public-private funds to expand effective solutions across three issue areas: economic opportunity, healthy futures, and youth development and school support.

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