Wisconsin

Report

Three-Year Results of the National Guard Youth ChalleNGe Evaluation

June, 2011
Megan Millenky, Dan Bloom, Sara Muller-Ravett, Joseph Broadus

After three years, participants in National Guard Youth ChalleNGe, an intensive, “quasi-military” residential program for high school dropouts, are more likely than their control group counterparts to have obtained a GED or high school diploma, to have earned college credits, and to be working. Their earnings are also 20 percent higher.

Report

Early Results of the National Guard Youth ChalleNGe Program Evaluation

February, 2009
Dan Bloom, Alissa Gardenhire, Conrad Mandsager

Very early results from a random assignment evaluation of the National Guard Youth ChalleNGe Program, an intensive, “quasi-military” residential program for high school dropouts, show that the program has large impacts on high school diploma and GED attainment and positive effects on working, college-going, health, self-efficacy, and avoiding arrest.

Working Paper
July, 2008
Greg Duncan, Cynthia Miller, Amy Classens, Mimi Engel, Heather Hill, Constance Lindsay

Implemented in 1994, New Hope provided full-time workers with several benefits for three years: an earnings supplement, low-cost health insurance, and subsidized child care. This working paper examines the program’s impacts on employment and earnings, as well as on family income and poverty, up to eight years beyond the point of random assignment.

Working Paper
July, 2008
Aletha Huston, Anjali E. Gupta, Alison C. Bentley, Chantelle Dowsett, Angelica Ware, Sylvia R. Epps

Implemented in 1994, New Hope provided full-time workers with several benefits for three years: an earnings supplement, low-cost health insurance, and subsidized child care. This working paper examines the effects of New Hope on children’s social behavior, parent-child relationships, and participation in out-of-school activities eight years after random assignment.

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